No Enemy But Time (1982) by Michael Bishop

noenemybuttimeI got kind of busy this weekend and never had a chance to link my most recent book review, which was actually posted last week at the Science Fiction and Other Suspect Ruminations blog, one of my favorite SF blogs. This review is part of a series of guest posts to promote the work of Michael Bishop, an SF author who has attracted critical acclaim throughout his career, but is not as well known as other SF authors. It’s an admirable effort by Joachim Boaz, the guy behind SF&OSR (who does not actually live in a city under the sea), and a reasonable pursuit considering that Bishop’s novel is one of the best I’ve read so far this year, and one of the best SF novels I’ve read from the (*cough* dreadful *cough*) eighties.

I reviewed Bishop’s 1982 Nebula Award winning novel, No Enemy But Timewhich also appears on David Pringle’s Top 100 Best Science Fiction Novels. If you have a taste for time travel, prehistory, and trope trampling, you should give this a whirl. I will definitely be adding more Bishop to my TBR list.

And don’t forget to keep checking Science Fiction and Other Suspect Ruminations for more Bishop posts this week! Some of my other favorite SF bloggers have been and will be participating!

 

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15 thoughts on “No Enemy But Time (1982) by Michael Bishop

  1. Joachim Boaz says:

    Thanks for the shout out! It’s been fun!

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    • Joachim Boaz says:

      (and I agree with your assessment of the 80s–haha)

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      • fromcouchtomoon says:

        Ugh, sometimes I envy your modern SF boycott.

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        • Joachim Boaz says:

          It’s only a recent boycott (4 years ago?). And, some authors continue to tempt me — Christopher Priest namely, and Bishop + Ian Watson + Effinger among others.

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          • Joachim Boaz says:

            *some authors who produced substantially in the 80s continue to tempt me.

            And Gene Wolfe….

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          • fromcouchtomoon says:

            Priest is someone who has appealed to me for a long time. And I’ll be reading my first Wolfe novel soon!

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          • Joachim Boaz says:

            I have Inverted City on the shelf, it’s 70s. But, what appeals me is Priest’s Dream Archipelago sequence of stories/novels.

            As for Wolfe, along with Cordwainer Smith and Thomas M. Disch, probably the biggest names I’ve yet to read. Ehh, I’m young, and I’ve read thousands of books so it isn’t such a big deal 😉

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          • Joachim Boaz says:

            And, I’ve cut back as of late due to my dissertation. Alas.

            Have you read any Ian Watson? I finished his short story collection A Very Slow Time Machine (1979) and was blown away.

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          • fromcouchtomoon says:

            No, that’s a new name to me… Ah, I see a collaboration with Bishop. May have to check him out.

            I figured the dissertation was part of your motivation for your guest post series 😉

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          • Joachim Boaz says:

            Ian Watson is an incredibly nice guy as well — I’ve talked to him on twitter a few times (about a French SF film, unfortunately it was canceled, that adapted one of his short stories in A Very Slow Time Machine). I have The Embedding (1974) on the shelf waiting to be read.

            Haha. In a way, I do have a conference in a week and a class to start teaching in the summer.

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    • fromcouchtomoon says:

      Agreed! Great idea!

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  2. […] speculative treatment about humanity’s early relatives, I recommend Nebula award-winning No Enemy But Time (1982) by Micheal Bishop, which I reviewed at Science Fiction and Other Suspect Ruminations for […]

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  3. […] patterns. Bishop, a White author, doesn’t shy from race— even his protagonist in his acclaimed No Enemy but Time (1982) is Black, for whom he writes in first-person, though in a considerably more generic fashion […]

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  4. […] that had somehow eluded me until now, was a must read when I came across a review of the novel at From couch to moon. I squeezed it into my reading schedule between my reading for Hugo nominations and when the actual […]

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  5. […] psychology, and human complexity are conveyed so well in so few pages. Or, Michael Bishop’s No Enemy but Time (1985), which Jesse at Speculiction just reviewed and reminded me of how one time travel novel […]

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