September 2016 Reading Review

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I haven’t been as fastidious about my blog this month, partly because I got hung up on writing that stupid review of The Clone. I’ve been doing this long enough now that I think I’m running out of things to say about the schlock I’ve been reading– I’ve said it all before, others have said it all long before, and lately I’ve been more interested in reading those other people than just spouting off my ignorant drivel. Also, I’ve been restricting my post-writing time to a small window in the mornings, as this blog has been leaking into my weekend days more than I’d like.

Plus, the weather has been nice! It’s like we’re having an actual autumn this year and it’s only been like in the 80-somethings this month, which makes me want to be outside more.

Books Read and Blogged Continue reading

Month in Review: May 2016

If it feels like this month at FC2M has been more gleefully contemptuous than usual, it’s only because I’m scraping the bottom of the Hugo ‘6 list, despite my careful planning to mix up the worthy classics with the dross. It’s not an even list to begin with, but man, those eighties, nineties, and aughties are painful to assign in any order. No amount of sugar makes Hominids go down easy.

 

Stuff I blogged Continue reading

Month in Review: April 2016

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Book Award News

I doubt it means anything that the sky suddenly opened up and hailed for five minutes right after I saw the Hugo shortlists, but that’s what happened. 4000 votes seems less like redoubled dog efforts and more like a galvanized voting community with little ballot overlap and little interest in the anything but the novel category. I just like to see my own nominees on the voting stats list in August… at the very bottom of the list probably… but still. Continue reading

Reading Month in Review: January 2016

It’s been a good winter. Five days of winter, exactly. Spread throughout the past two months of mild spring temps. In late December, we had three days of snow. Snow that stuck. Snow that piled. Snow that didn’t melt as soon as it hit the ground, or turn to slush the moment the sun rose the next day. Plus, we had one day that was chilly and windy, and last week we had another day that brought an afternoon of sleety snow. That didn’t stick. Or pile. And did melt as soon as it hit the ground. That’s my kind of winter!

And it was 78 degrees and gorgeous yesterday. (Today is Has-Anyone-Seen-Toto windy, my neighbors have a car-sized tumbleweed stuck in their yard, and I can’t find my garbage bin. But that’s beside the point.)

My reading pace has been just as agreeable and occasionally odd as the weather, sticking with fair weather SF the majority of the time, but occasionally delving into other book categories, which has, much to my surprise, reinvigorated my reading pace, rather than burdened it. It’s a pattern I think I’m going to stick with for a while.

But this is a SFuh blog, so let’s get to the SFuh.

BOOKS READ Continue reading

No Enemy But Time (1982) by Michael Bishop

noenemybuttimeI got kind of busy this weekend and never had a chance to link my most recent book review, which was actually posted last week at the Science Fiction and Other Suspect Ruminations blog, one of my favorite SF blogs. This review is part of a series of guest posts to promote the work of Michael Bishop, an SF author who has attracted critical acclaim throughout his career, but is not as well known as other SF authors. It’s an admirable effort by Joachim Boaz, the guy behind SF&OSR (who does not actually live in a city under the sea), and a reasonable pursuit considering that Bishop’s novel is one of the best I’ve read so far this year, and one of the best SF novels I’ve read from the (*cough* dreadful *cough*) eighties.

I reviewed Bishop’s 1982 Nebula Award winning novel, No Enemy But Timewhich also appears on David Pringle’s Top 100 Best Science Fiction Novels. If you have a taste for time travel, prehistory, and trope trampling, you should give this a whirl. I will definitely be adding more Bishop to my TBR list.

And don’t forget to keep checking Science Fiction and Other Suspect Ruminations for more Bishop posts this week! Some of my other favorite SF bloggers have been and will be participating!

 

The 2014 Hugo Award Nom Nom Noms

The 2014 (and 1939) Hugo Award nominees were just announced at Eastercon in Glasgow! The major deets are here.

And the 2014 noms are… [with my initial thoughts in brackets.]

Best Novel:
Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie (Orbit) [surprise, surprise. Here’s a link to my review.]
Neptune’s Brood by Charles Stross (Ace/Orbit UK) [Maybe he gets better, I tell myself.]
Parasite by Mira Grant (Orbit) [Will her fans back off if she finally wins one?]
Warbound, Book III of the Grimnoir Chronicles by Larry Correia (Baen Books) [No.]
The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson (Tor) [No. I read the first three and you can’t make me read more.]

[Overall opinion: Very disappointed. Was hoping to have an excuse to read Christopher Priest’s The Adjacent and Gareth L. Powell’s Ack Ack Macaque.] Continue reading